Tag Archives: Gladys Presley

Elvis’ First Guitar — A New Twist on a Old Story

Two new Elvis Statues in Tupelo

Every ElvisBlog article involves research on Google/Images. Sometimes I will scroll down well below the pertinent pictures just to see what new-to-me Elvis photos might show up. That’s how I found the one above.

The two statues are part of the several attractions added to make the visit to Elvis boyhood home in Tupelo a bigger experience. They were unveiled in 2012 as part of the 35th anniversary of Elvis’ passing. I like the contrast of young Elvis with his simple acoustic guitar in front of adult Elvis in all his jumpsuit and cape splendor.

Elvis at 13 Statue in Tupelo

There is another statue of young Elvis in the complex now known as the Elvis Presley Birthplace Museum and Chapel. I’ve never visited it, but by the time I do, I’ll bet even more stuff is added.

Elvis Presley Birthplace Museum

 

Let’s go back to the statues for a minute. Both young Elvis statues have him holding a guitar.  Tupelo is not only where Elvis was born, it is also where he got his first guitar. Just about every fan knows he bought it at the Tupelo Hardware Store.

Tupelo Hardware

Tupelo Hardware Inside

 

The story most people know about Elvis’ first guitar runs pretty close to the one in Elvis Day by Day.

Elvis Day by Day

The book’s authors, Peter Guralnick and Ernst Jorgensen, are two highly esteemed Elvis historians. Guralnick is a guest speaker at Elvis Week this year, and Jorgensen has had the same honor previously. They have done decades of research on Elvis and written several other books about him. So, what you read about Elvis in their books can be trusted as factual. Or at least factual according to their research documents as of 1999 when Elvis Day by Day was published. Here is the entry for January 8, 1946:

“On Elvis’ eleventh birthday, his parents buy him a guitar at the Tupelo Hardware Store. As Gladys Presley later tells the story, Elvis wanted a bicycle, but she was put off both by the cost and by her fears that he might get hurt.”

Color Picture of Elvis' First Guitar

Last year, a fellow Elvis fan named Carol Austin sent me a copy of a book written nine years after Elvis Day by Day. It states two things that differ from the earlier book – he did not go into the store wanting a bicycle, and it was not on his eleventh birthday. Why should we believe this different version of the story?

Book We Remember Elvis

Because the book, We Remember Elvis, was written by four people who were boyhood chums or relatives of young Elvis in Tupelo. If you want to fully understand the hardships that Gladys, Vernon, and Elvis went through prior to moving to Memphis, you can’t do better than this book. These four authors lived that life too. But, there were many happy moments as well. Chapter 33 – Elvis’s Christmas Wagon begins:

“Christmas of 1945 was great…. Elvis had gotten a glossy wooden Wagon Master…. That wagon was a spectacular model. The frames on the side slid in and out of metal holders.”

Elvis 1945 Christmas Present -- Wagon Master

Image from book – similar to Elvis’

Elvis took almost every child in his playgroup for rides in the first days after Christmas. On the last Saturday of the year, Elvis and his two best buddies, Odell Clark and Guy Thomas Harris, took turns pushing the wagon up the hill on Kelly Street and riding it down. They would give the passenger a huge shove and watch their friend take a roller coaster ride and hear the squeals of laughter.

When the boys tired, they rode the wagon down Kelly Street to the Assembly of God Church (since moved to the Elvis birthplace complex).

Elvis - Assembly of God Church Tupelo

In 1945, there were wide sandy ditches of the sides of the road, and the three boys parked the wagon and played in the sand with toy metal trucks carrying on a make-believe construction job. Then disaster hit, as described in the book:

“Coming along the road was a big dump truck filled with scrap metal driven by a neighbor named ‘Peanut’ Gamble.’ … He and some of the Randle boys pulled big pieces of metal out of grown up weeds on the back property lines. … [Gamble] then backed his big truck back onto the roadway. Unfortunately, Elvis’ new wagon was right behind the truck’s big wheels.”

The boys screamed “stop,” but it was too late and the wagon got crunched. Elvis picked up several broken pieces and stared in disbelief. Then he began hysterical crying and ran toward home.

“’Mama, Mama, Mama,’ he cried….Mama could fix anything! Gladys had heard his cry and was running toward her son. Her face was blood red and her breath was sporadic as she rushed to her child….Gladys grabbed Elvis into her arms, pulled him tight to her chest, but she trembled with the power of her emotions.”

Peanut Gamble caught up with them and apologized over and over. He took out his wallet and gave Elvis every bill he had. “I’m so sorry. I didn’t see it.”

Gladys carried Elvis all the way home as he clutched the money tightly. He had his chin resting on her shoulder and his arms and legs wrapped around her body. He was thinking of getting a new wagon, but another thought seeped in – maybe buying new rifle instead.

 

Let’s look at two calendars to get a sense of the timing of this story.

December 1945

The two dates circled are when Elvis got the wagon and when it got crushed.

January 1946

You all recognize January 8 as Elvis’ birthday. But the 5th of January is when Elvis went to Tupelo Hardware. As the book says, “The next Saturday was the day to go to Tupelo to replace the broken toy.” (The Presleys actually lived in the village of East Tupelo, now annexed into the city of Tupelo.)

By then, Elvis was committed to try to buy a 22 rifle with his money. Gladys wouldn’t hear of it, and doggedly maintained they were going to buy a wagon. Once in the store, Elvis took her hand and dragged her in the direction of the rifles. She continued past them and pulled him toward the wagons. Then something caught her eye and she looked up. Elvis’ eyes turned to see what she was looking at. It was a display of guitars.

The salesman saw the interest and asked, “Do you play the guitar, Mam?” Elvis made a quick glance back to the rifles before giving his full attention to the glistening guitar.

“The smart salesman immediately climbed the sliding ladder to take down the smallest of the instruments [it was a 1940s Kay model]. He slid the strap over Elvis’ head and adjusted the guitar at the perfect angle to fit Elvis’ young body. He handed him a small ivory pick. The child immediately placed his slender fingers on the proper frets as his Uncle Vester had taught him. When he strummed the strings with the pick, there was just enough harmony for the salesman to brag generously on the child’s talent.”

Elvis placed his money on the counter and got two one-dollar bills back. He strolled out of the store with the guitar still hanging over his shoulder. We can assume both he and his mother had big smiles on their faces. Gladys had to be happy that Elvis wasn’t carrying a rifle, and Elvis had to be thrilled with his new guitar.

January 1946

So, that’s how it all started. I am absolutely confident that Elvis told the story of his trip to Tupelo Hardware to his buddies numerous times, and they have recounted it in the book We Remember Elvis. This is the real story of Elvis’ first guitar.

 

Guernsey's Auction Sept 14, 2011

Elvis’ first guitar went up for auction at Guernsey’s on September 14, 2011 in New York City. I have spent entirely too much time on Google trying to find out what it went for, or if it even sold at all. If anyone knows, please put a message on Comments.

 

© 2017 Philip R Arnold, Original Elvis Blogmeister All Rights Reserved www.ElvisBlog.net

 

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Elvis, Elvis Presley, and Graceland are registered trademarks of Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc.

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ElvisBlog Mini-Nuggets #17

 

Elvis Beer Cans:  In 2004, Miller Brewing Co. released a set of eight commemorative beer cans celebrating 50 years of rock music.  Doing the math, that would mark the start of rock and roll in 1954, and we all know what happened then – Elvis’ first recording, “That’s All Right.”  So, of course Elvis was on one of the cans.

You might be surprised who the other seven rockers were:  Eric Clapton, Blondie, Alice Cooper, Bon Jovi, Def Leppard, Joe Walsh, and Willie Nelson.  The images of each artist were reproductions of Rolling Stone magazine covers with their faces on them.  The one for Elvis was dated September 22, 1977, the first Rolling Stone cover issued after his death.

Crummy Elvis Shit:  In 2008, someone Googled “Crummy Elvis Shit,” and 6,330 links came up.  ElvisBlog was #7 on the list because each of those three words had been included separately in an article on Elvis’ movie Live A Little, Love A Little.  Just for kicks, I Googled the phrase again recently, and this time there were 1,140,000 sites on the list.  So, it would appear the worldwide supply of Crummy Elvis Shit has grown appreciably in four years.  ElvisBlog moved higher on the list.  Many websites go through extensive steps to upgrade their SEO (Search Engine Optimization), but without doing any work at all, I can brag that Google now rates ElvisBlog #1in Crummy Elvis Shit.

 

Elvis Astrological Chart:  In 2009 the GottaHaveRockandRoll auction sold an Elvis astrological chart for $3,900 plus auctioneer’s fee.

Elvis Astrological Chart

If this seems like an outrageously high price, there were some good reasons to justify it.  The auction lot also included charts for Priscilla and Gladys.  In addition, there was a 23-page Interpretation, which included handwritten marks, underlinings and outlinings by Elvis.  The charts and interpretation were prepared by famed astrologer Dane Rudhyar using information assembled by Elvis’ buddy and hairstylist Larry Geller.  Geller gave it all to Elvis as a gift in 1966, and in 1974 Elvis gave it back to him.  When it was put up for auction the first time in 2001, Geller tossed in some personal 8×10 photographs (never-before-seen, of course) of Elvis and a backstage pass he wore at one of Elvis’ concerts.  They were still part of the lot that sold for $3,900 three years ago.

 

Elvis Proves Las Vegas Never Sleeps:   Take a close look at this Elvis concert poster from 1974.

Can you believe an Elvis show started at 3:00 in the morning?  Elvis had already performed twice that night, so we can presume he was just thrilled to do another one.  Who says Col. Parker didn’t work Elvis to death in the 70s?

Funniest Quote about Elvis I Ever Heard:  A few years ago, PBS did a documentary about Elvis, and it featured interview clips from Paul McCartney, Carl Perkins, Scotty Moore, and others.  Mark Knopfler, singer and guitarist for the band Dire Straits, told a story about when he was a young boy watching Elvis perform on the Ed Sullivan Show.  Knopfler’s father watched with him, and “Dad looked at me with real horror that I liked it.”

Smiling Gladys:  I have lamented here in this blog several times that Gladys always looks sad in all the photos of her.  So, I was really pleased to stumble across this picture on the internet.  It’s in pretty bad shape, but Gladys is smiling and even shows a little cleavage.  Great picture, but don’t copy/download/hotlink it yet.  I’m going to have my graphic artist buddy Carol Stephens clean it up, and I will post it again.


A  Cute Story, Maybe It’s True:  Here’s something I found on a Spanish website in English.  I think I’ve heard it before, but can’t remember for sure.

One day in the 70s, Linda Thompson talked Elvis into going with her to the local McDonalds restaurant near Graceland.  She said she was sick and tired of them never going out together.  Thompson made a bet with him — she said no one would recognize him and he could relax a little.  Elvis said he not only would be recognized but mobbed as well.  They walked in the McDonalds, approached the counter, and put in their orders.  Elvis ate his meal in wonder at the situation but really enjoyed his quiet night out.  So far, so good.

Then a man walked up to their table, looked at Elvis, and said he hated how men tried to look like Elvis Presley.  He said there was only one king and the others should give up.  Shocked at the man’s assumption that he was as impersonator, Elvis informed the stranger that he was indeed Elvis.  The man would not believe him, and said he pitied him for thinking he was Elvis.  Elvis tried again but could not convince the man.  Linda Thompson thoroughly enjoyed the whole situation and had an inspired idea.  She turned to Elvis and said, “Okay, Bob, enough is enough.  Stop playing.”

Elvis told her to confirm who he was.  She replied, “Will you cut the crap, Bob.”  Her ruse worked.  The man left their table.  Elvis was totally dumbfounded by what had happened, but he and Linda had a good laugh.

 

©  2012    Philip R Arnold, Original Elvis Blogmeister    All Rights Reserved    www.ElvisBlog.net

Elvis, Elvis Presley, and Graceland are registered trademarks of Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc.